At the Anti-Recidivism Coalition, we believe communities are stronger when individual people are safe, healthy, and whole.

At the Anti-Recidivism Coalition, we believe communities are stronger when individual people are safe, healthy, and whole.

our mission

What we believe

The Anti-Recidivism Coalition (ARC) works to end mass incarceration in California. To ensure our communities are safe, healthy, and whole, ARC empowers formerly and currently incarcerated people to thrive by providing a support network, comprehensive reentry services, and opportunities to advocate for policy change. Through our grassroots policy advocacy, we are dedicated to transforming the criminal justice system so that it is more just and equitable for all people.

We open doors for people

through these focus areas:

Inreach

Creating hope and nurturing positive cultural change in our prisons and detention facilities.

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Housing, Workforce, and Education

Building resilience by providing stable housing, high-quality jobs, and educational opportunities.

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Supportive Services

Offering guidance and care to returning individuals to help them navigate the challenges of reentry.

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Policy Advocacy

Expanding participation of system-involved young people and their families in justice reform efforts.

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a member

ARC serves people coming home from incarceration who want a community that will support their change and success. Members have access to supportive services including case management, trauma-informed counseling, housing, education, employment training, and mentorship. At its core, ARC members form a support network for each other as they make their way in the world.

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Members in CA
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Cosponsored bills that became CA law
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Incarcerated people in communication with ARC
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Pre-apprenticeship program graduates
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News & policy updates

July 13, 2022

Governor Newsom Signs Budget, including HART Team Funding

July 8, 2022

Statement on Roe v Wade

July 1, 2022

Statement on ACA 3

March 23, 2022

ARC Selected by Mackenzie Scott

March 8, 2022

Sam Lewis testifies against Prop 47 Rollbacks

February 8, 2022

NFL Inspire Change

December 7, 2021

NBA Grant

October 13, 2021

ARC/NBA visit Indiana Prison

October 13, 2021

DC Advocacy

October 13, 2021

Magnolia Gardening

August 11, 2021

ARC member Ezekiel Nishiyama selected as Los Angeles County Youth Commissioner

July 13, 2021

ARC’s Hope and Redemption Team to Expand to 31 CDCR Prisons

April 28, 2021

Advocates Praise Bi-Partisan Reform Package that Treats Children in the Criminal Justice System Like Children

April 11, 2021

 Statement on Derek Chauvin Verdict

April 1, 2021

Netflix Show “Worn Stories” features ARC’s Ride Home Program

December 9, 2020

DA Gascón Policies Introduced

November 3, 2020

Prop 17 Passes

November 3, 2020

Prop 25 fails to pass

November 3, 2020

Prop 20 Defeated

October 2, 2020

Bills signed by Governor, including AB 2147

October 1, 2020

Governor Gavin Newsom Signs Criminal Justice Legislation Into Law

August 29, 2020

Statement from Anti-Recidivism Coalition (ARC) on Change of Leadership at California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR)

August 27, 2020

$30 Million Public-Private Partnership Launched to Support Returning Citizens, as California Urgently Reduces Prison Populations to Curb Impact of COVID-19

August 18, 2020

ARC August 2020 Inside Newsletter

May 31, 2020

Statement from Anti-Recidivism Coalition (ARC) on killing of George Floyd

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Impact Stories

Rose Brown

In my journey inside, nothing could really prepare me for what was to come. Everyone’s journey is different & I’ve learned these basic things in my re-entry and transition:Be patient (Especially with yourself), don’t compare yourself to others (Your path is yours alone), and continue climbing the mountain (Obstacles will come, just keep climbing). Being in the trenches of re-entry & working with an organization that focuses on re-entry made me realize what my purpose really is-to give back. Surviving Board, paroling, discharging from parole…I’ve climbed that mountain. My focus today is to make a positive difference to the community I’ve harmed and the inside community I’ve left behind.

J’Mel Carter

There were so many things that contributed to me making the poor choice to live a criminal and gang lifestyle. I don’t mention these facts to justify my despicable actions. With the help of good men and women and through education and hard work, I was able to change and transform the person I was into the person I was meant to be.

Pamela Thompson

When I was sentenced to 33 years to life under the third strike law, I thought my life was over and lost hope. 17 years into  sentence, I got tired of feeling hopeless and decided to start attending self-help groups. Soon enough, I was the one leading them. After serving 24 years I was resentenced and released under 1170 (d)(1). I am now enjoying my freedom by giving back to my community through the work with ARC and different local organizations. As a life coach, I help ARC Members by lending my lived experiences to help guide and mentor them as they navigate their own reentry journey.

Rodney Bryant

Understanding all that CA offered me a chance to start fresh; however, I soon realized that even though the landscape changed, those old childhood issues still persisted. In 1990 I found myself making impulsive & irrational decisions whenever stressed. That year, I was sentenced to serve an indeterminate term of 15 years-to-Life. I spent more than 28 years of my life in correctional facilities; however, with hard work, persistence, & divine intervention my life was transformed. I spent a considerable amount of time on self-improvement, earning a High School Diploma, various vocational trades, and self-help certifications. Wanting to help make a difference, I became a Peer Literacy Tutor, Recreational Coach, and Youth Mentor, as I continued to seek self-help through self-improvement.

Angel Zubiate

It had been a rocky experience each time that an employer would ask “why are you being tracked like an animal?” Or the confused public eye that would question the same thing. My inability to swim in a pool or beach with family, friends, and loved ones because the monitor would glitch causing for my parole officer to panic that a registered gang member was on the loose. Now that I am completely free to travel and swim, work where I choose, wear shorts in the summer with out feeling judged, I could tell you that today I am as blessed as can be.

Jose Santana

US Forestry Service Fireman

I’m doing fire work now because it has given me self confidence and self worth that I feel I used to lack. Nowadays I hold my head up high and take pride in everything I do because what I do has value that I truly appreciate. I’m no longer hurting the community, I’m giving back to it. I’m constantly humbled when I see my friends, family and strangers and they thank me for my service. I get a bit embarrassed by it to be honest.